ISPCA rescue pony with extremely overgrown hooves 5 months ago

ISPCA rescue pony with extremely overgrown hooves

*This article contains detail of animal neglect.*

Nash is now "enjoying life in his new home".

The Irish Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals have said that a pony they rescued with severely overgrown hooves is doing much better.

Outlining the case on their Instagram page, the ISPCA explained that Nash was found in a field in Cloughjourdan in Co Tipperary and was subsequently brought in for care and examination at their National Animal Centre in Longford.

The pony received regular farrier treatment and recovered from the neglect. He is now said to be "enjoying life in is new home".

A Co. Offaly man has since pleaded guilty to animal cruelty at the Nenagh District Court. He was fined €1,000 and ordered to pay €750 in costs.

The caption on the ISPCA's post reads: "Enquiries by the ISPCA Animal Inspector Emma Carroll identified the defendant as the owner but he initially claimed that he had never seen the pony before. The following day, the defendant admitted ownership of the pony. He claimed that he had a farrier tend the pony's hooves every six months but there had been a delay due to Covid and his farrier being ill."

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Speaking on the case, the ISPCA's chief inspector Conor Dowling said: "It is sad and unacceptable that Nash had to suffer needlessly due to the lack of basic equine knowledge and understanding of his owners.

"Thanks to a vigilant member of the public for contacting the ISPCA to highlight this issue, we were able to alleviate his pain and prevent further suffering. Nash now has a far better quality of life in his new home where he is loved and cared for."

The ISPCA then reminded their followers that "regular hoof trimming by a qualified farrier is recommended every six to eight weeks" as this will "identify any issues and correct hoof problems".

They added that animal cruelty, neglect or abuse should be reported to the ISPCA on 0818 515 515, by email helpline@ispca.ie or through their website right here.