Dublin measles outbreak: Number of children infected rises to 11 2 years ago

Dublin measles outbreak: Number of children infected rises to 11

At least 11 children have now contracted measles in an outbreak in Dublin, the Health Service Executive has said.

The number of known cases in the capital has risen from five in recent days, the HSE said in a statement today.

The HSE said it is "particularly concerned" about the risk of measles in children who were at Temple St Children’s Hospital on a number of days in July.

The dates are:

  • Wednesday 25 July between 9.30am and 2pm in the Outpatients Department
  • Thursday 26 July 26 between 7.15pm and midnight in the Emergency Department
  • Friday 27 July between 4.20pm and 7.30pm in the Emergency Department
  • Monday 6 August between 2.20pm and 10pm in the Emergency Department

Cases have also been identified in both children and adults who have come into contact with measles cases in the community in Dublin.

Symptoms may not appear immediately - there is a risk of measles for up to 21 days after exposure to a case.

Dublin measles outbreak: Number of children infected rises to 11

Anyone who was at the hospital on those dates and who develops symptoms of the measles has been asked to stay at home to prevent spreading the disease and to contact their GP rather than the hospital.

Here's what to look out for:

  • cold-like symptoms, such as a runny nose, watery eyes, swollen eyelids and sneezing
  • red eyes and sensitivity to light
  • a mild to severe temperature, which may peak at over 40.6°C  for several days, then fall but go up again when the rash appears
  • tiny greyish-white spots in the mouth and throat
  • tiredness, irritability and general lack of energy
  • aches and pains
  • poor appetite
  • a dry cough
  • red-brown spotty rash

"Measles can be a serious illness and is highly infectious," said Dr Helena Murray, Specialist in Public Health Medicine.

"The best protection is to be fully vaccinated with two doses of MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella) vaccine.”