Taoiseach Micheál Martin says he "can’t understand" why Rotunda filming was allowed 1 week ago

Taoiseach Micheál Martin says he "can’t understand" why Rotunda filming was allowed

"I don't think it's appropriate"

Taoiseach Micheál Martin said he can't understand why The Rotunda filming went ahead.

According to Virgin Media's Zara King, An Taoiseach said there shouldn't be one set of rules for film crews and another for parents.

He stated that he “can’t understand the framework under which clinicians allowed that (filming) to happen. I believe you can’t have one set of guidance for partners and another set of guidelines for media”

“Partners shouldn’t be facing restrictions and I’ve been consistent on that for quite some time," he added.

Health Minister Stephen Donnelly echoed his views.

He stated that fathers should not be facing restrictions.

“I don’t think it’s appropriate if partners were denied access that a TV crew should be allowed in. Fathers shouldn’t be facing restrictions.”

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The Rotunda, which aired on Wednesday night, has come under severe criticism from the public.

Numerous women have said the series has caused distress and is completely tone-deaf.

The Rotunda has responded to the backlash.

They stated: "Management at the Rotunda Hospital decided to proceed with allowing the filming of The Rotunda TV series this year as it is an important platform that allows patients & their families to share their pregnancy & birth stories.

"Filming took place with minimal numbers of crew on site and strict infection prevention and control protocols were adhered to at all times."

RTÉ stressed that the aim of the series was “to authentically tell the stories of mothers and their partners with care and compassion, and to celebrate the work of hospital staff in sometimes very difficult circumstances while at the same time bringing stories of love and compassion to the airwaves."

However, the sheer upset and outrage the series has caused says it all.

The series certainly shouldn't of went ahead when pregnant people were forced to give birth alone, receive harrowing news alone, and be isolated during what is supposed to be one of the most joyous times in their lives.