Ryanair passengers could face travel chaos as Irish pilots have voted to strike 2 months ago

Ryanair passengers could face travel chaos as Irish pilots have voted to strike

There could soon be significant disruption for Ryanair passengers as its Irish pilots have voted in favour of striking.

An overwhelming majority – 94 per cent – of pilots backed industrial action in a ballot today, according to the Fórsa Trade Union.

This comes amid a dispute over pay and conditions.

It's not yet clear when a strike would take place. The union must give the airline at least a week's notice, meaning passengers travelling with Ryanair later in this month could be affected.

Fórsa has given the budget carrier until Monday to agree to its proposals. It will outline details of industrial action within seven days if a deal isn't reached, it said.

Strikes can be avoided if Ryanair chooses to engage "professionally and constructively in talks," said Fórsa assistant general secretary Ian McDonnell.

Pilots, he continued, "feel they have been forced into contemplating potentially-disruptive industrial action by a company that seems either unwilling or unable to negotiate in a professional and constructive manner."

 

Ryanair in "a healthy financial position"

The union submitted a pay claim in March "in line with sector norms" and has accused the company of stalling in its negotiations.

Ryanair, which posted profits of €1 billion last year, is in "a healthy financial position and can fairly reward its pilots," it added.

This comes after UK-based Ryanair pilots announced five strike days in late August and early September.

The British Airline Pilots' Association is engaged in its own pay dispute with the company.

The Irish Travel Agents Association (ITAA) has warned of the far-reaching ramifications of any strike.

Both holidaymakers and corporate travellers would be impacted during the busiest time of the year for the travel industry, while there would also be a knock-on effect for connecting travel and accommodation.

It's urging customers who have booked through a travel agent to speak to their agent in the even of a strike.