Family hit with backlash after making 6-year-old run full marathon 1 month ago

Family hit with backlash after making 6-year-old run full marathon

"This is f***ed up"

An American family has been hit with major backlash after they made their 6-year-old run a full marathon.

People have been calling out Ben and Kami Crawford after their entire family completed a 26.2-mile marathon.

Their 6-year-old son Rainier was reportedly spotted crying throughout the marathon.

People are now accusing the parents of child neglect and abuse.

It is believed child services has visited the family.

The parents said he was crying during the marathon because he fell and scraped his knee.

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They stated: "We have never forced any of our children to run a marathon and we cannot even imagine that as feasible practically or emotionally.

"We have given all of our kids the option for every race."

They continued, "Both parents gave him a 50/50 chance of completing it and were ready to pull the plug at any moment if he requested it or if we viewed his safety at risk.

"We asked him numerous times if he wanted to stop and he was VERY clear that his preference was to continue. We did not see any sign of heat exhaustion or dehydration and honored his request to keep on going."

Olympian Lee Troop slated the parents for allowing their son to participate.

He also said the race organisers never should have let a 6-year-old take part.

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"Child stopping every 3mins after 20 miles, crying and emotionally distressed. Parents bribing him to finish & he’ll get Pringles.

"Parents see no issue in allowing this to happen. Everything about this is wrong!"

Many agreed with the athlete and said the 6-year-old never should have taken part.

"Desperate for attention so you risk your child’s long-term musculoskeletal health."

One wrote, "My pediatrician would have called CPS on me if I did this. I remember specifically asking him how far my kid could run and at that age, it was nowhere near a 5k. Her growth plates were her priority, not my ego."


Another said, "Parent to parent- this is f***ed up. What made you think this is a good idea?"

"This is so sad. Desperate for attention so you risk your child’s long-term musculoskeletal health. Put him in a fun run or maybe a kids 5k. Let him learn running is to enjoy."

The parents have stressed that their son wanted to take part, but does that really make it okay?

Many agreed that saying no to their son would have been a much wiser move.

What do you think?