Men suffer from post-natal depression too... and it's surprisingly common 5 years ago

Men suffer from post-natal depression too... and it's surprisingly common

One in ten Irish men suffer from post-natal depression, according to Irish research.

Financial pressures and a lack of support are deemed to be key risk factors, while men who have the option of paid paternity leave are less likely to suffer.

The study of 100 men aged between 25 and 40, entitled ‘Paternal Post-natal Depression (PPND): Prevalence and Associated Factors’, was presented at the the last Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Conference.

Study authors Lloyd Philpott, a public health nurse and Dr. Paul Corcoran, a statistician, also discovered that the fathers of babies who had colic or sleep problems were more susceptible to post-natal depression.

Interestingly, men who worked as chefs appeared to be more at risk than those who worked in more than 40 other professions.

Most women will experience the so-called baby blues in the first week after delivery, when they can be emotional and tearful. This doesn’t last and passes quickly. PND usually starts within a few months of delivery but can start up to 12 months after.

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