Study reveals dads get more me time – and in other news; water is still wet 1 month ago

Study reveals dads get more me time – and in other news; water is still wet

They really needed a study to find this out?

I think if the past 14 months have shown us anything (other than how long we can really wear the same yoga pants and avoid washing our hair), it is that mums really are the glue that keeps everything together.

Kids, school, homework, dinners, DIY projects, housework, actual work, laundry – mums are running the show. Big time. And while it might be true that dads today are more involved in the care of both kids and the home than what was common just a generation or two ago, the reality is that in the vast amount of families, mums are the ones doing the most around the house and in terms of childcare, sacrificing me-time for time spent caring for the family.

In fact, according to a new survey, 68 percent of mums say they take only one-five hours of  'me-time' each week – compared to 37 percent of dads, who admit they have on average six to 10 hours to themselves every single week.  

The survey, which was conducted in the US, is just a drop in an ocean of polls and research that proves us mums are getting less time for self-care even as dads try to be equal partners.

And while men these days are doing a little bit more in terms of childcare of housework than previous generations were, the reality is that a significant gap remains – and it has no doubt been made wider these past 14 months, as the pandemic forced so many mothers to take on the brunt of the homeschool duties too.

Advertisement

A few years ago, a study of thousands of families in western countries found that 59 percent of women are experiencing burnout, anxiety or depression, compared to 46 percent of men, and as many as 43 percent of women who live with a partner feel no one is helping them.

Wondering why you are feeling so wrecked all the time? Here might just be one of the reasons. You are getting just a couple of hours to yourself every week while your partner is no doubt enjoying as many as six to ten hours all to himself.

Maternal burnout is on the rise – and we now know why.

Interestingly, research has shown that if dads just did just 50 minutes more at home each day (childcare and chores), our society could get on track to meet gender equality targets. And more well-rested, cups filled, happy mothers. Which, I think we can all agree, would benefit not only her own family, but also society as a whole.