Fluoride in drinking water linked to thyroid issues, weight gain AND depression 4 years ago

Fluoride in drinking water linked to thyroid issues, weight gain AND depression

A new report linking fluoride with a higher incidence of underactive thyroid suggests that the negatives of adding it to drinking water may outweigh the dental health benefits.

A survey of GP practices across the UK, conducted by the University of Kent, revealed that people living in areas of high fluoridation were 30% more likely to suffer the effects of an underactive thyroid, which can lead to fatigue, depression and weight gain, particularly in women.

According to lead author Professor Stephen Peckham, the findings should be cause for alarm: “The difference between the West Midlands, which fluoridates, and Manchester, which doesn’t was particularly striking." he said.

Ireland is the last EU country still adding fluoride to drinking water. The level has been set at between 0.6-0.8 mg per litre, an amount deemed optimal for protecting the nation's oral health.

The University of Kent study showed a 30% higher incidence of hypothyroidism in GP practices located where fluoride levels in excess of 0.3mg per litre.