Children who own phones younger are less likely to do well in tests 1 year ago

Children who own phones younger are less likely to do well in tests

Children who own phones younger are less likely to do well in tests.

Research carried out by the Economic and Social Research Institute (ERSI) as part of the ongoing Growing Up In Ireland study showed that children who had their own phones from age nine did worse in tests at age 13.

The children with phones performed four percent worse in standardised reading and mathematical tests on average compared to those who didn't have a phone at that age.

RTE reports that 40 percent of children involved in the study had had a phone at age nine.

The ERSI suggested that the findings may influence schools in whether they want to further restrict phone usage for young children.

The report found that children attending more social disadvantaged schools were more likely to have phones earlier.

Those coming from high income families were less likely to have a phone at nine-years-old. Despite this, the link between lower scores and phones remained irrespective of socio-economic factors.